What is a Part-time Mother?

I don’t know what a part-time mother is, but I know I’m not it.  A part-time mother is not awake for well over an hour at 4 A.M. climbing out of bed every five minutes to restart the dulcet notes of a magical glowing sea horse.  A part-time mother does not tediously cook and prepare nutritious and delectable delights for her toddler, only to have the tasty morsels flung to the floor.  A part-time mother does not use her last amount of energy for the day in gently rocking her teething toddler to sleep.  A part-time mother does not do all of the above with love and patience.

 

For the first year of Sam’s life, I easily fell under the category of full-time mother. “Full-time mother” is the moniker given to the woman who often works, without that rewarding deposit in the bank account, to care for her children and home from morning’s light to well past sunset.  The use of the employment lingo “full-time” lends deserved weight and respect to the hard work of mothering and home-making.

 

I was happily a full-time mother until this past spring when a job opportunity came my way.  The job is a cozy fit for me in many ways.  True, the first several months were difficult due to a steep learning curve.  But now I feel I can settle into a comfortable groove of steadily doing my job with an Absolute Commitment to Excellence, otherwise known in the company jargon as “ACE.”  I love earning a paycheck again, the scheduling flexibility and part-time hours suit me perfectly, and I genuinely enjoy the work.  The feel-good bonus is that I may actually be helping people.  But there is one thing that niggles at me from time to time.

 

Why do I need to give up the “full-time mother” label?  Have I somehow been demoted to a part-time mother?  How would you even define a part-time mother?  I can’t help but feel slighted by the parenting community, if such a thing exists, by this perceived demotion.  I don’t feel compelled to defend my working outside the home; that’s not what this is about.  It’s the right choice for our family, and that’s that.  I guess I’m just thinking about labels, how they can change perceptions in society, how they can influence the images we have of ourselves and others, and how they can invite scorn or respect.

 

I still consider myself very much a full-time mother to Sam, part-time employment notwithstanding.   When acquaintances, during the inevitable small talk that I as an introvert have always dreaded, ask what I do, I always start by proudly saying that during the day I am home with my son.  I describe my evening job second.  I am firstly Me in all my flawed and brilliant glory.  But when it comes to my roles and relationships, I hope that as Sam grows older I will continue to always feel my role as his mother before being an employee.  I can’t imagine it any other way: life as a full-time mother for perhaps the next twenty years.  That is the ride I happily signed on for!

 

On a side note—I haven’t posted on this blog in several months.  The job training was time consuming.  That doesn’t mean that I haven’t had blog post ideas swirling around in my crowded brain jostling up against tidbits and fragments like the forgotten location of Sam’s Mets pajamas and the date of this year’s charity auction and I really must make that dentist appointment.  Some ideas to write about include the love of step-parents, my hatred of Rosemond, and sex after having children (does such a thing exist?)  So be on the lookout for more posts from this Crunchy Munchy (full-time!) Mama!

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